Ship part

Relocation of a private pioneer museum to Sukanen Ship Village

Visitors will get a better sense of early life on the farm when the Alfred Volman Building is filled with artifacts from the past.

Have you ever wondered how the settlers lived and what tools they used on a daily basis?

Visitors to the Sukanen Ship Pioneer Village and Museum will get a better sense of early life on the farm when the Alfred Volman Building is filled with artifacts from the past.

Volman’s grandfather came to Canada from Hungary in 1903, worked in the coal mines at Michel, British Columbia, and then in 1905 established his farm in the Lestock district south of Yorkton.

Collections of items used to work and live on the farm over the past 115 years will be displayed in the building.

“A lot of these things have been dumped into a big quagmire. No place to put it,” Volman said in an interview as family members set up the collection.

“It was in the early 1900s. There was furniture that was 150 years old. Certain if it has deteriorated too much.”

Volman decided to save and restore objects, constructing a building called the Volman Brothers Museum in Leross, next to the Leross Museum.

“The city is falling apart and they wanted this stuff out of there.” There are only 40 inhabitants left.

He wanted to donate the collection to Leross, then heard that it might be sold. Volman wanted to save the family legacy.

He approached the Sukanen Museum and arranged to construct a 49-by-84-foot building for the collections.

“It fits perfectly with what we do,” Sukanen President Gord Ross told members.

Volman now wishes he had expanded the building.

“I am very happy that the museum accepted me to come here,” said Volman, 84. “I wanted to keep this stuff. I am the youngest (of seven boys and two girls). When I left, it left.

Items on display range from the power board he used for 34 years to run the boiler room at the Gray Nuns Hospital to a bandsaw, an old stove, tools, a camera and a host of other items. ‘other stuff.

The machinery includes a steam engine, a Massey-Harris 55 tractor, a Cockshutt 30 tractor, a threshing machine, a hay rack, a binder and a grain wagon.

Volman is the last of the family. “Only two of the boys got married. I remained single.

They hope the building will be ready for the public by the bee-threshing on September 10-11.

Ron Walter can be reached at [email protected]