Ship boat

This magnificent Swedish ship is moored in Canary Wharf until Thursday


This magnificent Swedish ship is moored in Canary Wharf until Thursday
Image: Jonathan Browning

Visit Canary Wharf this week and you’ll be in for quite a show.

Götheborg of Sweden – the three-masted replica of an 18th century East Indian ship – is moored at South Dock Quay. The facsimile trading vessel – which took more than a decade to build – is taking part in an epic two-year expedition from Stockholm to Shanghai, stopping in London until Thursday (August 11) after already making a detour, ahem, showboating to ensure the Bridge tower has done its seesaw thing.

The bow of a ship in front of the Tower of London
Image: Jonathan Browning

You can view Götheborg from the mainland or purchase a ticket to board the ship; peek, smell the tar, admire her gun deck, and learn about the ship’s past.

Tower Bridge lets a high-masted ship pass below
Image: Jonathan Browning

The original ship (which sank in 1745) was owned by the Swedish East India Company, and although the Gothenburg website states that it was “a purely commercial venture and there is no had no element of colonization”, it is not as simple as that. As Eurozine previously suggested, any such trade depended on the products of slavery. Either way, visitors are encouraged to “come prepared with all your questions!” so maybe this is your cue to ask about the real impact and legacy of Gothenburg’s trading past.

Gothenburg of Sweden, South Dock Quay to Canary Wharf, until August 11

Last updated August 08, 2022